For My Awesome Fans

The following is the first chapter (1st draft version) of my new book that I am writing, City Of Crows. It is a supernatural thriller, with maybe a little bit of horror thrown in to the mix. I’m sharing it now so that my readers, who are completely awesome and always give their support and encouragement and show so much enthusiasm for everything I do, can get an idea of what the book will be like, as it’s a little different from the last four books I’ve written. For those of you who read this, you are amazing! Enough talk, on to the story!

 

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CITY OF CROWS

Ana Velasco’s feet pounded hard against the earth as she sprinted through the woods. Her heart was pounding loudly in her ears, the only sounds she could hear now being the fearful thump-THUMP of her beating heart, and her own panting breath. She was struggling for air, struggling to keep breathing, she had been running as fast as she could for so long. She had to, though, if she stopped… she died.

Ana raised her arms and shielded her face as she ran though a low hanging thicket of tree branches, sending leaves flying everywhere as she ploughed through. She heard the branches snap under the force of her momentum, but she just kept running, too afraid to even slow down, too terrified to even look back. She knew they were back there. She knew they were following her. Chasing her. Pursuing her.

Hunting her.

Continuing to run as fast as she could, Ana felt her foot catch on something sticking up out of the ground. She cried out as she fell, throwing her hands forward to try and stop herself from falling. She hit the ground hard, her face crashing into the dirt and fallen leaves. Even though her arms and hands were now chafed and scratched and bloody, and her head throbbed painfully, Ana pushed herself up to her feet, sobbing gently as she gasped for air, twigs and dried leaves now caught in her long black hair, and kept running.

Finally, Ana saw up ahead the place she was heading. It was a small cabin, desolate and seemingly abandoned. The cabin looked ancient, like it had been built hundreds of years ago out of nothing but what the builder had found on the forest floor. Long lengths of wood packed in tightly together, the gaps sealed with mud. But there was safety in that cabin. Behind its rickety door and uneven windows, Ana knew there was her only hope.

Ana didn’t spare a glance upward as a shadow passed over her face. Instead, it seemed as though the passing shadow urged her to run faster.  Her long black hair trailed out behind her as she fled, like the tail of a comet, until Ana reached the door to her cabin and pushed her way inside. Panting and wheezing, Ana immediately turned and slammed the door shut. As she leaned against it and looked around the inside of the small, one room, cabin, Ana wished that the door had a lock. Although, she knew that a lock would serve her no purpose now. If they wanted to come in, they would. And she didn’t have much time.

Still panting, trying to ignore the excruciating stitch that was twisting like a hot knife in her side, Ana hurried around the cabin and began pulling open the cabinets and snatching out numerous objects, not caring when she knocked other items to the floor in her hurry.

“Quick, quick, quick!” Ana muttered to herself fearfully.

Ana swept numerous items out of her cabinets in a hurry, carelessly tossing them to the floor as she searched. Blue candles and bottles of incense all thumped against the wooden floor and rolled away, but Ana paid them no attention. She thrust her arms deep inside the cabinets above her head and finally found what she was looking for. Still panting in her exhaustion and fear, Ana retrieved a compact mirror and a tall, thick, white, candle. Clutching them both tightly in her hands, Ana turned around and hurried towards the corner of the large rug that covered the majority of the tiny cabin floor. Clutching the mirror and candle in one hand, Ana bent down and grasped the corner of the rug in her free hand and yanked it backwards, tossing the whole rug aside in one fling.

Beneath the rug was a symbol marked on the floor in white paint. It was large, taking up the entire space that the rug had covered. It was a wide circle, but within the circle was a five pointed star, painted as though in one continuous stroke, the line never breaking. One point of the star was pointing directly at the door through which Ana had rushed only moments ago.

This star was known as a pentagram.

Ana quickly set the compact mirror down on the floor above the point of the star that faced the door, opening the mirror and placing it carefully outside of the pentagram’s circle, the reflective glass facing the only way in or out. Ana then put the thick candle down on the floor, directly on top of the tip of the pentagram’s point closest to the door, right behind the compact mirror. Her hands shaking, Ana then took a book of matches from her pocket and tried to strike a match, but her hands were too unsteady.

“Dammit, come on,” Ana pleaded through gritted teeth, not sure if she wanted to yell in anger or sob in fear.

Finally she managed to strike a match and a small flame began to flicker at the end of the stick pinched in her fingers. Ana lit the candle and then blew out the match, falling to her knees in the center of the pentagram, facing the burning candle. Somewhere outside, she heard the distinct call of a crow, which was then answered by another crow.

Caw! Caw! Caw!

Forcing herself to ignore them, Ana focused on the burning fire of the candle, poured all of her attention into it, and stared at it without blinking. When she spoke, it was in a hurried whisper, as though in a single breath that she couldn’t wait to exhale, speaking words as fast and quietly as she could.

Craft the spell in the fire, 

Craft it well, weave it higher,

Weave it now of shining flame, 

None shall come to hurt or maim. 

None shall pass this fiery wall, 

None shall pass, no, none at all.

Having spent all of her breath, Ana puffed for a moment, then drew in another deep breath and repeated the chant, even faster than before.

Craft the spell in the fire, 

Craft it well, weave it higher, 

Weave it now of shining flame, 

None shall come to hurt or maim. 

None shall pass this fiery wall, 

None shall pass, no, none at all.

Ana jumped when she heard the scuttling noise on the roof of her cabin. She instinctively wanted to look up toward the noise, but knew that she needed to keep focus on the burning flame on the white candle. Ana then heard the call of a crow once more, this time from the roof of her cabin. It must have landed there. Ana swallowed hard, her throat dry and sore, but repeated the chant again, this time louder than a whisper.

Craft the spell in the fire, 

Craft it well, weave it higher, 

Weave it now of shining flame, 

None shall come to hurt or maim. 

None shall pass this fiery wall, 

None shall pass, no, none at all.

Then the fire on the candle suddenly began to burn brighter. It seemed to intensify, growing taller as Ana spoke her words, staring unblinkingly into the center of the flame. Ana could hear the wind outside suddenly growing stronger, banging the shutters outside her windows. The wind now howled through the forest, wailing and moaning, while the sound of cawing crows could still be heard outside. Ana said the words again, louder still, almost shouting them. By the time Ana had finished the chant once more, the flame on the candle was now towering from the floor to Ana’s eye level, a good three feet as she kneeled before it. Ana began the chant once more, this time yelling the words at the candle.

“CRAFT THE SPELL IN THE FIRE,

CRAFT IT WELL, WEAVE IT HI-“

Suddenly, the door to the cabin burst open and a powerful gust of wind pushed its way inside, sending pages of books flipping rapidly and discarded candles rolling across the floor. The small mirror was knocked over in the wind and fell closed on itself, no longer reflecting the door. The sudden blast of wind surprised Ana and she turned her face away from the door, shielding her eyes with her arm, breaking eye contact with the candle flame for the first time since she lit it. The instant Ana looked away, the towering flame suddenly died.

“No!” Ana cried as she realized what she had done.

Before she was able to do anything about what had happened, Ana looked up and saw the shadowy shapes approaching through her door, descending upon her.

All she could do was scream.

A Little Something For Halloween

Dark Crow

*Note from the author.

Before you start reading this short story, perhaps a little context would be useful. First of all, this is a continuation of a short story published in my collection of horror and thriller tales, Sinister Nightmares. The original story, The Crows, was about an old man who killed crows for pleasure, until they decided that they’d had enough. You won’t need to have read The Crows to understand this story, however. I decided this story, which I wrote a year or so ago, but did nothing with, was suitable for this Halloween post as I am currently writing my horror novel, City of Crows, and the themes of which go relatively hand in hand.

Something else to bear in mind while you read. In ancient beliefs, crows were, and still are, thought to be the keepers of the dead. They carry the souls of the dead to the afterlife. And, sometimes… bring them back.

Happy Halloween.

The Returned

The pearly white cat rubbed against the teenage boy’s leg, meowing as he held out the piece of meat. She was purring and staring up at the food with anticipation, the bell on her collar jingling gently with every movement. Her bright eyes and pearly white coat stood out easily in the darkness of the alley as midnight approached.

“Here, puss. Good puss. Puss-puss-puss,” the boy was cooing.

Just as the cat stretched out its neck to gently take the food that was being offered, the boy quickly reached down with his other hand and grabbed the cat by the back of the neck, causing her to yowl in surprise. The boy lifted the cat off her feet by the scruff of her neck, grinning as he did so. He tossed aside the bait he had used and walked deeper into the alley. He stopped and reached down to something by his feet, which he had stashed beside some overflowing trash cans.

He lifted the canvas bag up and shook it open. Then he shoved the pearly white cat inside. He zipped it shut as the cat began to cry a long, drawn-out howl that only cats can manage. The boy thumped the bag with his fist and snapped, “Shut up in there!”

A few minutes later, the boy was walking over a small bridge that stretched across a river in the middle of town. The cat was still crying from within the bag, her pathetic mewing becoming more and more emphatic. The boy approached the edge of the bridge and looked around quickly, trying to keep the bag hidden between his body and the bridge wall. After he determined that there was no one around, he turned to face the water and lifted the bag up onto the ledge.

Meow!” the cat called miserably. The boy could feel the poor creature shaking inside the bag, but this just made him smile.

With a small nudge, the boy pushed the bag over the edge. He heard the cat cry as she fell. He heard the splash as the bag hit the water. Then he heard nothing else as the bag sank beneath the surface. He stood there for a few minutes, staring down at the water, waiting until he knew enough time had passed for the cat to have definitely drowned.

Serves it right, he thought. Stupid cat.

Suddenly, he felt a shadow pass over him. Looking up, he saw a dark shape circling overhead, flying lower and lower. As he watched, he saw a crow swoop down and land on the bridge wall, only a few feet away. He watched the crow as it appeared to peer over the edge of the bridge and down to the river below. It was very still as it stared down to the murky water that flowed beneath. Then it slowly lifted its head and stared at the boy with one dark eye. It neither moved nor blinked. It just stood there, staring.

“What are you looking at?” the boy sneered.

The crow finally flapped its wings and ruffled its feathers. It lowered its head and opened its beak, cawing loudly at the boy, who jumped at the sudden movement of the bird. The boy scowled, feeling stupid for being scared by a bird. He stepped closer to the crow and swung his hand out at it, forcing it to hop backwards.

“Get outta here!” he snapped.

However, the crow only walked closer, snapping its beak at him and cawing in annoyance.

“I said, get the f-OW!” the boy cried out in pain suddenly, dancing backwards and clutching his hand. He had swung at the crow again, only to receive a vicious peck on the flesh between his thumb and index finger. The boy looked down at the wound as he clutched it tightly and saw blood seeping between the fingers of his uninjured hand. The boy left quickly, shouting abuse at the crow that was still sitting on the side of the bridge, cawing loudly into the night.

As the boy hurried along, ducking through an alleyway, he silently cursed the bird for taking a sizeable chunk out of his right hand. He considered going back to see if it was still there and, if it was, throwing a rock at it. Maybe he could break its wings and throw it into the river after the cat. He continued along, lost in violent thought, until he noticed a pair of eyes on a window-ledge above, staring down at him. Looking up, he saw a grey tabby-cat sitting on the ledge, watching him with wary eyes, twitching its tail from left to right.

The boy smiled to himself, thinking that maybe he could break the cat’s neck to get out some of his frustration. He took a step toward it, moving slowly so as not to startle it.

“Puss-puss-puss,” he called. “Here, puss.”

But the cat flattened its ears and hissed loudly at the boy, making him pause and think twice before getting closer.

“Fine,” he said under his breath. “If that’s the way you want it.”

He bent down and picked up a fallen brick from the ground. He lifted it over his shoulder and took a careful step closer to the growling tabby, trying not to scare it off before he could crush its skull under the brick. The tabby hissed and swiped a paw at the air as the boy came within arms-reach. He smiled and lifted the brick a little higher, taking careful aim.

Rrowr!”

The boy felt something land on his shoulder, startling him into dropping the brick, and in the same instant, something sharp bit into his earlobe.

“Ahh!” he cried out in pain. He jumped around in the alley, clutching his ear as the second cat that pounced from somewhere above and bit his ear leaped away and joined the tabby on the window to watch the boy clutch at his ravaged ear.

“Son of a bitch!” the boy shouted. He locked eyes with the pair of cats on the window and glared with contempt. “You’re dead, you mangy bastards! Both of you, you’re…”

He stopped in mid-sentence as he saw movement out of the corner of his eye. Turning his head, he saw another cat peering out at him from behind a dumpster. Then another two lifted their heads from inside. More appeared from around garbage cans, others were perched on windowsills; dozens more were on the rooftops, staring down at him in the centre of the alley, more than the boy could count. He stared around at all of them, uncertain of what to do. There were more cats in this alley than he had ever seen in one place. But what the boy found particularly unnerving was the fact that all the cats were completely still and silent. No pacing, no meowing, no cleaning. They were all just staring at him with bright unblinking eyes.

Behind him, the boy heard a noise, the rustle of feathers and a loud caw. He turned in the direction of the noise and looked down the alley back the way he had come, back toward the bridge. He looked out the end of the alley into the street, expecting to see a crow, but what he saw was definitely not a crow.

It was a cat… with pearly white fur.

It was sitting on the sidewalk, bathed in the light from a street lamp above its position, giving a glowing quality to its fur coat. Its eyes shone bright and yellow, reflecting the light shining down on them, as both were locked on the boy’s. The two stared at each other, neither moving, neither making a sound, amidst the crowd of cats who were quietly watching.

The boy began to back away, deciding that the situation was entirely too weird and unsettling. The hairs on his arms and the back of his neck were all standing on end and he figured the best place he could be right now was anywhere else. He turned and walked quickly away, not stopping or slowing down to even look over his shoulder. But as he walked away, he could feel a hundred eyes on his back and he couldn’t get out of his mind the picture of the cat with the pearly white fur. And how it had looked slightly wet.

The next morning, after a restless night of inconsistent sleep, the boy dragged himself into the kitchen for breakfast. His father was already seated at the small breakfast table, a plate of toast crumbs pushed aside and his hand wrapped around a steaming mug of coffee while he read the newspaper, a breeze from the open window rustling the corners of the pages. He glanced up at his son when he heard him enter the room.

“Jeez, what the hell happened to you, boy?” he growled, looking at his son’s ear.

“I was attacked,” the boy muttered.

“Christ, more fights?” his father snapped, slamming his paper down on the table.

“It wasn’t a fight!” the boy snapped back. “I was attacked by a cat.”

His father grunted and returned to his paper. “You and cats, I don’t know why you hate them so much. You’re as bad as your grandad, before he disappeared.”

“Why?” the boy asked as he poured himself a bowl of cereal, not really caring that much.

“Ah, the old bastard hated crows. Couldn’t stand ‘em, killed ‘em every chance he got. His hunting cabin was full of stuffed ones he’d shot.”

The boy’s hand jerked in surprise as he poured the milk onto his cereal, spilling some onto the counter.

“Crows?” he repeated.

“Yes, boy, crows! You know, those big black birds that eat road-kill. And clean that mess up, you useless tool.”

The boy quickly wiped down the counter and sat down at the table with his cereal.

“I saw a crow last night,” he said. “It bit my hand.”

“Hmph,” the boy’s father grunted. “I guess they’re not that bad.”

The boy frowned and ate a spoonful of cereal. He chewed, but felt something strange in his mouth. The cereal felt wrong. He stopped chewing and looked down into his bowl. It took a moment for his mind to register what he was seeing, but once he realized, his eyes bulged and his face turned white. He dropped the spoon and gasped. Suddenly he felt he couldn’t breathe. He choked and spluttered and clawed at the table. He tried to stand, but in his panic he only knocked his chair over and clutched the table, unable to find his feet as he flailed them about, his sneakers squeaking on the kitchen floor.

“What-” his father began, but realizing that his son was choking, he leaped to his feet and rushed around the table. He began slamming the boy hard on the back with the palm of his hand, again and again, until finally the boy coughed up the blockage and spat it out onto the table. He gasped for breath and fell to his knees, still leaning on the table.

“Jesus, chew your food, boy!” his father growled.

But the boy didn’t hear him. He was staring in horror at the glob on the table he had just spat out. It was a wadded ball of fur. And in his bowl of cereal, countless more hairs swam amongst his breakfast, each one an easily recognizable pearly white.

That evening, the boy’s father went to work at the warehouse for the night shift. The boy stayed home and played video games, trying not to think about that morning. Normally, he would have gone out on a Saturday night, but after what happened, he just felt like it was a better idea to lie low. He didn’t want to go out, just in case all those cats were waiting for him. Especially the pearly white one.

But as he sat there, playing the most recent Assassin’s Creed game, he heard something. Curious, he paused his game and listened.

He could hear the soft jingling of a bell.

He looked around the room for the source of the noise, but could see nothing that might have made a sound like a bell.

The boy walked to the front door, switched on the exterior light and peered through the peephole, thinking that someone may have been ringing the doorbell, and that the doorbell was broken. But when he looked through the hole, there was no one there. He began to turn away, but something caught his eye. He looked through the peephole once more and tried to focus on what he had seen at the edge of the front lawn, just on the line between the light and the dark.

Cats. Three of them. Just sitting there, staring at the house. The boy moved to a window and looked outside. He saw other cats, more of them this time. He counted almost a dozen, all sitting motionless and staring at the house. He ran to another window and was met with the same sight. He moved to another window, and another and another, cats, cats, cats, all still, all staring, dozens upon dozens of cats, their eyes glowing softly in the night.

The bell rang again.

The ringing had become louder and more insistent. The boy was finally able to hear the direction it was coming from and turned to face the closed door to the kitchen. The ringing was coming from there, from inside the house. The boy’s eyes grew wide and his blood ran cold, rendering him frozen in place as he realized something he should have thought of much earlier.

His father left the kitchen window open.

The boy’s first thought was to flee the house, but the sight of the cats waiting outside was all that stopped him from doing so. The boy looked around quickly for something to defend himself with and his eyes landed on the iron poker beside the fireplace. He snatched it up and lifted it into a swinging position on his shoulder. Cautiously, he approached the kitchen door. He placed a hand upon it and gently pushed, moving slowly into the room.

At first, he thought the room was empty. His eyes scanned the area and saw nothing out of place. But then he noticed that sitting on top of the fridge was a large, black crow. When it saw the boy enter the room, it turned to face him. It lowered its head and fluffed its wings, shouting one defiant caw!

The boy gripped the poker tighter in both hands and took a step closer to the bird, ready to knock its head clean off. The crow turned its head and looked at the boy with one glassy eye, a black orb that the boy could see himself reflected in. He could see himself standing with a ferocious look on his face, the iron poker positioned over his shoulder, ready to swing.

Suddenly, he saw something move off to the side. He turned his attention to the movement and his blood ran cold for the second time. The cats were coming through the window. The boy backed up as the swarm of felines came in through the window and filled the kitchen. The flow seemed to never end as cat after cat after cat just kept coming through. But they didn’t attack. They didn’t growl or hiss or spit. They simply found a place to sit and waited, their curious eyes fixed on the boy, who had backed up against the wall, his way to the door now blocked by a sea of cats.

Then the bell rang again.

The boy looked around the room for the noise, but saw nothing. As far as he could see, none of the cats wore bells, but even if they did, they were so still that it never would have rung in the first place.

Again, the bell rang, and the boy realized something. The sound was slightly muffled, as though it was coming from inside a sealed box or jar.

Caw! The crow cried once more.

With one more ring of the bell, the boy finally understood and was consumed with confusion and terror at the realization of where the sound was coming from. Surrounded by dozens of cats and under the judgmental eye of the crow, the boy dropped the poker in his horror and would have fallen over if he weren’t leaning on the wall.

The bell was inside him.

He lifted his shirt and looked at his exposed torso. His mouth dropped open, his hands started to tremble and all of the colour drained from his face. There was something pressing against the inside of his stomach, pushing the flesh outward before settling, then repeating the process again. And with each movement, the bell rang gently.

Suddenly, the boy felt wracked with pain. He clutched his stomach and doubled over, falling to his knees as he grimaced and cried out. He tried to scream, but instead he just began to cough violently. He felt something trickling down his chin and saw that he had coughed blood up onto the floor. He kept coughing, more and more blood falling to the tiles. He was on all fours, trying to crawl towards the phone to call for help, but he was rendered immobile from the pain that had started in his stomach and was now making its way into his chest. He looked around helplessly, but saw only the indifferent stares of the cats and the cold eyes of the crow, still high above on the fridge.

The boy stopped coughing, but this only alarmed him more, because now he couldn’t draw breath. He tried to inhale, but it was a futile attempt. He gasped and panicked and tried once more to reach the phone, but he was weakened from pain and the throng of cats blocked his way. He began to gag, his back heaving and convulsing. Blood was dripping from his mouth and running down his chin and neck, spattering all over the floor. Small claws suddenly poked out through his neck, gouging the flesh as they scratched from the inside. The boy clutched at his neck as the pain grew more unbearable and more blood poured from the open wounds. He could feel the bones in his neck shifting and cracking as something was forcing them around, as though trying to make room. He felt something ripping and tearing at the back of his throat, hitting him with a fresh bout of intolerable pain. When he felt something flopping around inside his mouth, he lowered his head and spat it out. When it hit the floor, he didn’t know how to comprehend what he was looking at. He stared at it, delirious with fear and pain and blood loss, not sure if it was even real. His tongue was lying on the floor, ripped out of his mouth, now in the pool of blood on the kitchen tiles. Finally, the boy felt something pushing around the inside of his mouth. He opened wide and let it out.

First came the paws. They both stretched out of the boy’s mouth and searched for something to grab hold of. Failing that, the claws extended and they were dug into the boy’s cheeks. As the cat began to drag itself out of his mouth, it left deep gouges in the sides of the boy’s face, more blood now running from his cheeks and dripping onto his shoulders.

The cat’s head emerged from the boy’s mouth, its ears flattened, moving faster now that it was almost halfway out. It clawed at the boy’s face some more until it was finally free and leaped nimbly to the floor, the bell on her collar jingling happily and her pearly-white fur stained with blood.

The boy stared at the cat and the cat stared back at him. The boy was wobbling on his hands and knees, his eyes drifting in and out of focus, his breathing short, weak, and ragged, blood still oozing from his mouth and the tears in his neck and cheeks. He blinked slowly, barely conscious. On some level, he noticed that the crow cawed loudly and the pearly white cat was moving closer. As his vision faded, he saw the other cats finally move. They began to move toward him, following the pearly white cat, meowing loudly, all licking their lips.

When the boy’s father got home well after midnight, he was annoyed to find that the exterior light had been left on. As if the bills weren’t high enough already. His annoyance was not abated inside where he saw that his son had left on all the interior lights as well as the TV with one of his video games running. He began stomping through the house, calling for his son, but was confused when he got no response. He searched every room, but found no sign that his son was home, or had been recently.

When he walked into the kitchen, he stopped short, staring down at the floor.

“What..?” he began, but trailed off. He knelt down and picked up the poker from the tiled floor. Looking around, he could see nothing else out of the ordinary. He glanced out the window, but there was nothing that could tell him where his son had gone. There wasn’t even anything of little interest. Only a very fat pearly white cat; sitting on the fence, cleaning its fur.

A Two-Sentence Horror Story

Who says a story needs to be long? Sometimes the best and most chilling ones are micro stories. Check out my two-sentence micro story below.

“I can’t sleep,” she whispered as she climbed into bed beside me. I awoke with a start, drenched in a cold sweat, clutching the dirt-covered dress she had been buried in.”

See what you can come up with and add it in the comments.

PEACE!